Trust

Is This the Right Move?

Resignations – 7 Things Not to Do When Resigning

The goal of resigning is to protect your reference for the future.  If you have done great work for the last few years, don’t screw it up with a bad resignation.

  1. Waltz in to your bosses office and announce “I’m  out of here”

Well, so much for the courteous approach.

Prepare a letter stating you are resigning with a last day noted.  Give 2 weeks’ notice. Be sure to account for any outstanding vacation.

Present the letter in a face-to-face meeting (no slipping on his/her desk or sending an email).  Yes, it’s uncomfortable, but part of being professional.

  1. Do nothing, take long lunches, take extra sick days, come in late/leave early during your notice period.

The deal is to be professional.  Create a list of everything that’s on your plate divided into what will be completed by the time you leave and what will not, with the status it will be in when you leave.

Present the list in the resignation meeting.

This list helps to make the meeting less tense.

It also helps your boss save face with her boss when she announces your departure.  She shows she has it under control.

  1. Tell them where you are going.

This is optional.  It may just give your boss the opening to dump on the new company.

Why not say, “I shall call you when I get settled”.

  1. Get upset if they walk you out.

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It may be just an HR policy against the worst case scenario.

Assemble all your key possession in a single drawer before you meet your boss so you can exit quickly if necessary.

 

  1. Resent negative reaction from your boss.

 

Your boss may react poorly to the news.  That can include yelling or worse.

Your boss may deploy tools to slow you down.

These include:

Guilt – How could you do this after all I have done for you?

Intimidation – If you think I shall give you a good reference in the future, think     again

Flattery – Your team can’t go on without you.

Bribery/Promises – Gee, I was just about to set up a meeting to give you a raise/new project/promotion

These are just ways of giving your boss time to prepare for your eventual departure which may be your choice or may not.  Resigning is usually a sign of serious disaffection with the company and they usually can’t change that.  If you resign as a ploy to get a raise for example, it’s seen as immature and erodes trust.

 

  1. Make a loud announcement in the middle of the office, “I’m out of here you bunch of losers”

 

Give your boss time to announce your departure.  Don’t be a focus of discontent.  If other people want to leave, they need to take steps on their own.

 

  1. Neglect to capture the cell numbers and home addresses for everyone you liked working with. They may make a move in the future themselves.

 

After you’re gone, send them holiday greetings and stay in touch.  They are valuable nodes on your personal career network.  . You may want to reach out to them, for a reference or even a job one day.


Nadine

Nadine is one of the original members and owners of Planet4IT, and has watched the company become something great.
She is the Chief Financial officer here, and her hard work ensures everything is kept in tip top shape.
Another role she has is to help companies find the top talent out there.
Her track record speaks for itself.
Nadine can be reached through email, or by calling Planet4IT

 

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Is This the Right Move?

While standing in line at The Bay over Christmas, a couple behind me were having a conversation about asking for a counter offer during a job resignation attempt.  I couldn’t help myself; I turned around and said “I’m a head hunter and I would advise against doing that”.

So, why not ask for a raise?

It’s the blackmail element you must avoid.  In your boss’s eye’s it is blackmail when you come to her/him with an offer from another company with which he/she must compete.

It may not seem that way – the boss may flatter you and tell you the company can’t go on without you.  Promises of promotions, or new projects will pop up.  Wow, but, should you have to resign to get these changes? It’s really just management doing its job to stabilize the situation in the short run, while they gets organized to shed you in the long run.

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Reasons Not to Initiate a Counter Offer

  1. If you use this ransom style, it erodes the trust between you and your boss. This could have unwanted consequences related to the day-to-day atmosphere and your career progress/shelf life in that organization.
  2. Will more money change the fundamental reason why you went out to look for a new job in the first place? If you ignore that reason and accept a counter offer, the satisfaction will be short lived. Remember, they can’t change the company for one person.
  3. What is the motivation for your current company to match/exceed your other offer?

Perhaps you are on a mission critical project.  The raise is a band aid to keep you on the project until the end.  But, watch out once the project is over.

  1. You may find you are not assigned to projects that will enhance your skills or prove your capabilities to qualify you for promotion. The company knows you are dissatisfied and thus a risk to any key project.  The belief is that you may leave after the glow of the raise has faded. Why invest in you if you are on your way out?

Business Analyst

Sure, ask for a raise if you think you are underpaid, either related to others or because you feel you are doing an outstanding job and deserve a premium.

Do your research. Are you underpaid, by how much? What is an appropriate premium?  A good head hunter can tell you what the going rates are at the top and the bottom.

Approach your boss at a non-distracted time and explain why you believe you should get a raise.  If it goes well, super, if not you may gain insight into your performance perception, or you may just have to try to find a new job.  At least you gave it a shot.

 


Nadine

Nadine is one of the original members and owners of Planet4IT, and has watched the company become something great.
She is the Chief Financial officer here, and her hard work ensures everything is kept in tip top shape.
Another role she has is to help companies find the top talent out there.
Her track record speaks for itself.
Nadine can be reached through email, or by calling Planet4IT